SC Mortgages of NegroesThis old slave road in Charleston is probably the road many of our ancestors traveled to the Slave Mart

 

old Slave road in Charleston


The Forgotten Resource

South Carolina's mortgage records were recorded in Charlestown (Charleston), South Carolina, starting in 1734. The records are predominately, Mortgages of Negroes. As Negroes were considered property, they were mortgaged thus. Once the mortgage was satisfied, the slaves were deeded back to the owner. If the mortgage was not satisfied, the slaves were sold to the highest bidder or to the person holding the mortgage.

In searching through these records, I was able to locate the owner of my husbands gggrandmother and other family members. Then, with a little furthur research I was able to come up with this synopsis:

Ellenor McBride took out a mortgage on her slaves in 1841 and 1843, with Lucretia mentioned as one and Edmund and Merrimon mentioned as one of the others. Ellenor McBride took out a mortgage of negroes in Charleston, and A. John Beckley put up the bond of Five Hundred and Thirty Three dollars, dated April 3rd 1841, for Ned and Creshia. Michael McBride, husband of Ellenor also had numerous mortgages recorded with other family members. Michael McBride was a noted Slave Trader.

Creshia (Lucretia) and Ned, through the default of the mortgage of Ellenor McBride, became the property of Gov. J. P. Richardson. The Richardson’s, the Manning’s and the Canty (Cantey’s) acquired many of their slaves through this process, while many others were acquired by deed of will. The Richardson’s and the Manning were members of St. Mark’s Church. Lucretia, having been baptized and confirmed, appears in the church records, along with other members of the family. The records of St. Mark’s church list the Slaveowner and list the slaves as belong to......and they are also listed with their husband and children.

In the church records of St. Mark's Church, this is noted on page 49, Confirmation Feb 25 1854 at St. Marks Chapel servants of Gov. Richardson : Lewis, Lucretia. May 4 at St. Marks Chapel servants of Gov. J. P. Richardson: Abram, Pool, Wartee, Ned, Delia, Edinboro, Brass, Phyllis, Lucien, Wilson, Bella, William, Amelia, Vicy, Lecricia. May 4 at St James Chapel servants of J. B. Richardson: William, Lucy, Jenny, William (Big), servants of Tho. C. Richardson: Job, Nora, Edmund. Communicants of St Marks Clarendon 1855 colored: Belonging to Hon. J. P. Richardson: Abraham, Mary....A’s wife, died April 12 1856, Lucien, Cretia... L’s, Louis, Communicants St Mark’s 1855 colored belonging to R. C. Richardson: Harriet, Fanny, Edmond. July 1856 belonging to J. P. Richardson, Pool, Adele, Wastee, Amelia, Phillis, Lenah, Nancy, Vicy, Lue, Delia.

The last entry for colored reads: Colored Bacchus. Bacchus was the son of March and Lucretia McBride.

Creshia’s maiden name was Lawson. Her father or her mother was a Felder. Ned, who later came to be known as Ned Felder, was probably the brother of Creshia, later known to be Lucretia Lawson. Lucretia married March McBride, who was probably first owned by a Vaughn and then by Ellenor McBride or the McBride family, who were owners of the Rip Rap Plantation. Ref. In the Historic Sketches of Sumter County, page 227 it states: Rip Raps on 378 near Dabbs Crossroads. Now owned by James McBride Dabbs. Inherited from his grandfather, Jas. McBride, for whom was named tract of land originally granted by the King of England to Peter Mellette in 1750 and later sold to James Bradley and in turn given to his daughter, Mrs. James, a widow.

Death records of the children of Lucretia, indicate March McBride as the father, with Lucretia Lawson as the mother. Edmond, youngest son of Lucretia and March changed his name to Edmund Vaughn sometime around 1872.

Alex and Delia Lawson were the parents of Lucretia. Lucretia Lawson McBride Vaughn, was my husbands gggrandmother, March McBride was her husband. Edmund McBride Vaughn, youngest son of Lucretia and March, was my husband’s ggrandfather.

James B. Richardson took out a mortgage unto Richard C. Richardson for Seven Thousand dollars for 69 slaves:-------------Merrimon, Edmond.*

 

The following are the names of some of the slaves owned by J. B. Richardson that were mortgaged in 1846 to secure a $14,000 loan from Richard C. Richardson who held a seven thousand bond and the slaves as hostage:

Amelia* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Beck from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Betsey from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Binah from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Bob from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Cato from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Charles* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Cicero from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Clarissa from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Coneo from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Cyrus from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Davy from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Dilney from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Dorcas from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Edmond* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Edward* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Elsey from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Hannah from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Harry from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Hemimy from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Henrietta from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Henry from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Honnoun from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Isham from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Joe from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Lavonas from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Lizzy from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Lucy* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Lucy from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Lydia from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Maria from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Mary from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Maulo from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Merriman* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Milley from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Mima from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Molley from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Molley from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Motte from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Nancy from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Nelson from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Newson from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

no name from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Peter from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Peter from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Ralph from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Rena from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Robin* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Rose* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Rose from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Sally from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Sam* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Sam from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Sampson from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Seabrook from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Shadrick* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Sharper from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Suckey from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Sue from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Susannah from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Thisby* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Tom* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Tommy from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Toney from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Tupper from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Will* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

William* from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

Wilson from James B. to Richard C. May 14 1845

 

The Lilliputians

According to the History of Sumter County, James B. Richardson had a group of slaves that were very talented in the playing of musical instruments. His little group was called the "Lilliputians" It was said to have been the most widely known band in the Sumter District, at Momus Hall. It was composed of five little boys, who after drawing large crowds in Charleston, went on a southern tour. Their performances were said to have pleased "even a musically fastidious audience. The leader, Robin, a full blooded negro, aged thirteen, had the habits and disposition of an uncivilized African. When a small child, he made the corn-stalk fiddles and reed flutes so common to plantation children, but attracted attention when he manufactured for himself from cypress shingles, a violin with horse-hair strings, and a bass string of waxed twine. A Charleston visitor was so impressed that he persuaded Colonel Richardson to send the child to the city for instruction. In four months Robin learned to play the violin very well, understood the notes in music and could read a little. When he returned to Momus Hall, he began to instruct Sanders, who in a month learned the notes and how to play the second violin. Later Sanders studied the flute. A mild and submissive child, except to members of his own race, Sanders was a "prime boy" with the hoe, and even when cotton was light, he could pick 150 pounds a day. Robin tried again to train several other boys, but with little success. Edward, aged nine, and Henry, aged eight, a half brother of Robin, progressed so slowly that Colonel Richardson sent them to the music master in Charleston, who gave them up after two months. Robin then made both of them very good violinists and taught Edward the guitar in a month. Henry was so unruly that it was said that no human being could control him except his master. March,the youngest, aged about seven, performed admirably on the triangle and was learning the violin. These little musicians played for many dances at Momus Hall and perhaps, too, in the ballroom of Big Home, for the numerous families descended from the first Richard Richardson, lived in a perpetual round of big house parties and nightly home dances.

 

South Carolina Mortgage Records are available on Microfilm through Interlibrary Loan and through the Family History Library. More information can be sought through the SC Historical Commission.

Mortgage Records

Author

South Carolina. Secretary of State.

Title

Mortgage records, 1734-1860; index, 1709-1840.

Publication Information

Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1951.

Format

27 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.

Notes

Microfilm of original records filmed at the Historical Commission in

Columbia, South Carolina.

Contents

Records predominently "mortgages of negroes". Includes sale of land,

bonds, furniture, livestock, and miscellaneous property. Also

includes cattle marks.

Includes index.

US/CAN

Film Area

Index to mortgages, Aaron - Zylstra 1766-1840 ---------- 0022627

Index to mortgages, 1741-1748

Index to journal BB

Index to mortgages, 1709-1719

Recording of cattle marks

Mortgages, v. AB-EF 1734-1750 ---------- 0022628

Mortgages, v. KK-MM 1736-1738 ---------- 0022629

Mortgages, v. NN-OO 1738-1740 ---------- 0022630

Mortgages, v. PP-VV 1740-1753 ---------- 0022631

Mortgages, v. WW 1753-1756 ---------- 0022632

Mortgages, v. XX-YY 1757-1761 ---------- 0022633

Mortgages, v. ZZ 1761-1766 ---------- 0022634

Mortgages, v. AAA-BBB 1766-1769 ---------- 0022635

Mortgages, v. CCC-DDD 1769-1777 ---------- 0022636

Mortgages, v. EEE-FFF 1776-1777 ---------- 0022637

Mortgages, v. GGG-HHH 1776-1794 ---------- 0022638

Mortgages, v. III-KKK 1795-1799 ---------- 0022639

Mortgages, v. LLL-MMM 1800-1807 ---------- 0022640

Mortgages, v. NNN-PPP 1808-1816 ---------- 0022641

Mortgages, v. QQQ-RRR 1816-1820 ---------- 0022642

Mortgages, v. SSS-TTT 1821-1825 ---------- 0022643

Mortgages, v. UUU-WWW 1826-1831 ---------- 0022644

Mortgages, v. XXX-YYY 1832-1834 ---------- 0022645

Mortgages, v. ZZZ 1835-1840 ---------- 0022646

Mortgages, v. 4A-4B 1840-1843 ---------- 0022647

Mortgages, v. 4C-4D 1844-1847 ---------- 0022648

Mortgages, v. 4E-4F 1848-1851 ---------- 0022649

Mortgages, v. 4G-4H 1852-1853 ---------- 0022650

Mortgages, v. 4I-4K 1854-1856 ---------- 0022651

Mortgages, v. 4L-4M 1857-1858 ---------- 0022652

Mortgages, v. 4N-4O 1859-1860 ---------- 0022653

This Record Found Under

1. Afro-Americans - South Carolina

2. South Carolina - Land and property

3. South Carolina - Slavery and bondage

 


Last Update: 10/2008
Web Author: EE Vaughn
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