Reflections

 


Someone once said, "Through our ancestors, we are all related." The family ties that exist in those small towns in the south are greater than you can possibly imagine. Most of the people in one given area, were related in one way or another, as many as three times. In researching Clarendon and Sumter Counties, I find this to be the case with many of the the families there.


AND FROM THIS, WILL A TREE GROW


After slavery, many of our ancestors continued to remain in the environment that they were accustomed to. They continued to live in close proximity to their former masters. The often times continued to work for them. Their families were also close by.

Because of the war between the states, many of the men left home never to return. De ole plantashun days are gone, to come again no moreWives were left without husbands and children were left without fathers. Many of the mothers went away to work to support their children, leaving them with relatives to look after them until their return. Some never returned.

In looking through the census records, you will see several families that list adopted children, when in reality the children were not what you would think of as adopted but nieces, nephews, cousins and sometimes children of friends.

"DE OLE PLANTASHUN DAYS ARE GONE, TO COME AGAIN NO MORE".

 

Walk in the footsteps, of your ancestor's

Walk in the footsteps, of your ancestor's

Search out the surrounding families, learn about their nicknames, find out who that niece or nephew belonged to. Mayhap you will find your missing link.

 

 


Last Update: 10/2001
Web Author: EE Vaughn
Copyright 2000 by Pastense2 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED